Social networks “are creating a vain generation of self-obsessed people with child-like need for feedback”

I am afraid the following claims contain a certain level of truth, despite the sensational tone that forces the reader to take the whole piece carefully. I am convinced there is a form of addiction to social feedback, and that we are just starting to find out the extent of changes this will trigger “in real life”.

Let’s wait and see if other “top scientists” back these claims. I still find it amazing that there are not more studies on social networks users, and the impact on actual social life. Have you seen such research?

Facebook and Twitter have created a generation obsessed with themselves, who have short attention spans and a childlike desire for constant feedback on their lives, a top scientist believes.

Repeated exposure to social networking sites leaves users with an ‘identity crisis’, wanting attention in the manner of a toddler saying: ‘Look at me, Mummy, I’ve done this.’

Baroness Greenfield, professor of pharmacology at Oxford University, believes the growth of internet ‘friendships’ – as well as greater use of computer games – could effectively ‘rewire’ the brain.

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One comment

  1. Matt

    It is an interesting article! Personally I display many of the traits that are mentioned to be a by product of social media (not making eye contact etc)….yet I have never and will never use it. I guess I display these traits because of my childhood (bullied at home [dad and siblings], school, on the bus and at my ‘friends’ places when others where there [great ‘friends’ I had, hey?]).

    Sort of makes me question the validity of the original article, but on the whole I think we all know that taking ‘selfies’ and posting what you had for breakfast, lunch and tea is pretty damn vain….

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